TIG collaboration
"Children carry more between home & school than lunch and a backpack. Working together we can lighten their load." –National Association of School Psychologists

Suicide Intervention and Prevention

More than 36,000 people in the United States die by suicide every year. It is this country's 10th leading cause of death.  Suicide is the third leading cause of death for 15-to-24 year olds, and the fifth leading cause of death for 5-to-14 year olds. 

Teenagers experience strong feelings of stress, confusion, self-doubt, pressure to succeed, financial uncertainty, and other fears while growing up. For some teenagers, divorce, the formation of a new family with step-parents and step-siblings, or moving to a new community can be very unsettling and can intensify self-doubts. For some teens, suicide may appear to be a solution to their problems and stress.

Depression and suicidal feelings are treatable mental disorders. The child or adolescent needs to have his or her illness recognized and diagnosed, and appropriate treatment plans developed. When parents are in doubt whether their child has a serious problem, a psychiatric examination can be very helpful. It is important to remember that everyone can help prevent the tragedy of a suicide, just speak up and show that you care.

Useful Resources

Helpful Links

American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
American Association of Suicidology
American Foundation for Suicide Prevention

How Children Respond to Death

A child’s developmental level will influence the way he or she understands death and expresses grief. Over the course of childhood, children develop an understanding of the abstract concepts of death and all of the related beliefs.

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