TIG collaboration
"Children carry more between home & school than lunch and a backpack. Working together we can lighten their load." –National Association of School Psychologists

Trauma

One out of every 4 children attending school has been exposed to a traumatic event that can affect learning and/or behavior.  This startling statistic indicates the need for school staff to understand the impact and implications that trauma has in the school setting.

Trauma can take many forms, ex.  physical, emotional, sexual.  It can also be the result of nature (hurricane, tornado, etc.) or manmade (terrorism, nuclear, etc.).  Whatever the situation, the results can be devastating to students as well as staff.  Information and planning are critical to contributing to the most positive responses and outcomes of such events.

Userful Resources

 

Helpful Links

American Red Cross Disaster Services: Educator Information 
National Center for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder 
The International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies 
Traumatic Stress Disorders Resources 
The Road to Disaster Recovery 
 

For school-aged children and adolescents, school can be a place where they can resume their “normal” life. It can also pose some difficulties. Because grief often causes difficulty with concentration, schoolwork may become particularly difficult If necessary, talk to the child’s teacher about temporarily decreasing demands, and letting him or her take breaks to go to a counselor, school nurse or some other designated individual. Typically, children will not use this as a “crutch,” as is sometimes feared; they want to be like their peers, and will likely resume a normal workload as soon as they are able. If, after a few months, the child is still having difficulty, talk to his or her teacher, guidance counselor or pediatrician about professional counseling.

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